Hindlegs

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Quote from the Official Standard

"Legs large and muscular, longer in proportion than forelegs, so as to elevate loins.  Hocks slightly bent, well let down, leg long  and muscular from loins to hock; short, straight, strong lower part. Stifles round  and turned slightly outwards away from body.  Hock thereby made to approach each other and hind feet to turn outwards."

 

Orientation

 

Correct hind legs

Note that with correct hind legs, the knee joint (stifle) and the heel (hock joint) should be slightly bent and the lower part of the leg from the hock to the feet (the pasterns) should be short.

 

 Straight stifles  (fault)

With straight stifles of the hind legs, there is no flexion (bending) of  the stifles or hocks, resulting in a stilted, unnatural movement.

 

 Sickle hocks (fault)

With sickle hocks of the hind legs, there is an over flexion of the hock joint which gives the impression a 'sickle'.  The result is an unnatural, 'waterpumping' action of the hind legs during movement.

 

Illustration of the movement of a dog with normal hind legs (left) and a dog with sickle hocks (right).

The dog on the right with the sickle hocks can not extend his hocks properly during movement and this will restrict the driving force of his hind legs.

 

Correct hind legs

Cow hocked hind legs

"Stifles round  and turned slightly outwards away from body.  Hocks thereby made to approach each other and hind feet to turn outwards." Looking from the front, the hind legs will be visible between the front legs.

Stifles too close together, resulting in weak and unnatural hind movement. 

 

Pigeon-toed hind legs

Wide hind legs

Hocks are turned outward in stead of in and toes turned inwards in stead of out, resulting in difficult and very unnatural movement.

Hind legs too wide apart, caused by an inadequate 'pearshape' of the body (see Body).  

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